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LAWN TREATMENT  |  APRIL 24, 2015

Are Weeds Getting You Down?

by Allison Becker

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Our landscapes are springing back to life. Trees are leafing out, flowers are blooming, and grass is greening up. Nature is everywhere and it's inviting you to go outside and enjoy it.  The last thing you want to find as you stroll through the yard is crabgrass and weeds lurking about.  One option we recommend is applying pre-emergent weed control to your lawn each spring.

Pre-emergent is an herbicide that prevents the germination, or growth, of seeds.  They are what you'd call weedkillers.  They target and control the development of new weed seeds, so they won't invade your existing lawn and landscape beds.  Seeding of your lawn should be done in the fall because the pre-emergent herbicide will also prevent germination of new grass seed.  Pre-emergent herbicide should be applied in the spring, before May 10th in central Indiana, because warm temperatures will render the pre-emergent herbicide less effective.

Application of a pre-emergent herbicide will help control annual grasses such as crabgrass, foxtail, barnyard grass, and goose grass; broadleaf weeds such as dandelions, chickweed, henbit, black medic, purslane, and spurge.  The quality of your lawn can be vastly improved by the application of a pre-emergent herbicide.

Furthermore core aeration is highly recommended.  This should done in the fall so the holes don't leave a void in the pre-emergent herbicide barrier, which may limit the effectiveness of the pre-emergent and allow breakthrough of undesirable weeds and annual grasses.

Image Credits: Cover, by Michael Gil on flicker.com; Top, by Becker Landscape

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